This week on the Here’s What We Know Podcast, host Gary Scott Thomas had a wonderful time sitting down with the legendary television play-by-play broadcaster of the San Jose Sharks NBC Sports California National Hockey League, Randy Hahn. They dive into a reflective conversation about their long-standing careers in broadcasting. With over three decades behind the mic for the San Jose Sharks, Randy shares his journey from radio beginnings to becoming an iconic voice in sports.

So, join us as we skate through memory lane with one of hockey’s most enduring voices! Tune in now to this episode filled with fun and nostalgia!

This episode is sponsored by:

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In this Episode:

  • Randy spills the beans on how his broadcasting career started in 1991, and never in his wildest dreams did he imagine staying put for over 30 years. Talk about passion and dedication!
  • Discover the challenges and unexpected twists of longevity in the industry from two veterans who have seen it all. These guys know the ins and outs, and they’re ready to dish out all the behind-the-scenes stories.
  • Ever wondered why certain game moments stick out to fans? Randy shares his thoughts and reveals why those interactions during live broadcasts hold a special place in the hearts of broadcasters like himself.
  • Uncover the importance of connecting with fans and creating unforgettable experiences during games and events that resonate beyond the final buzzer. Get ready to feel that sense of community and camaraderie we all love about sports.
  • Randy opens up about making tough career moves, handling rejections early on, and eventually finding stability in a turbulent industry. His journey is one of resilience, which aspiring broadcasters can learn from.
  • Find out what ignited the passion in these seasoned pros for the world of broadcasting, from the magic of AM radio to influential figures like Johnny Carson‘s producer, Fred de Cordova. Inspiration awaits!
  • Learn how growing up Canadian shaped Randy’s path toward becoming a hockey broadcaster. Discover the unique influences that made him the voice we all know and love today.
  • And of course, you won’t want to miss the valuable advice these experienced voices share on building authenticity and self-confidence, essential traits for success in the media industry.

Quotations:

“You gotta move around to move up the ladder, and then sometimes you take a step down or go sideways or whatever, and you’re right, to be in one spot for 30-something years.” ~ Randy Hahn

“Thousands of times you’ve done that job, you kind of focus on that day and then you do it. And then somehow parts of it just leave you because you have to make room in your brain for the next game the next day and the next show. So it’s a lot of, do the material, flush it, and move on.” ~ Randy Hahn

“It’s part of the great thing about the job that fans remind you of moments that maybe weren’t the iconic big moments for the Sharks in their history.” ~ Randy Hahn

“To them, that was a special moment. And you may have forgotten it. And it does remind you of it. And it just shows you that it’s a journey. And it’s a thing that means a lot to a lot of people. And for me, it’s a job. But to the listener and the viewer, it’s their joy, it’s their fun, it’s their escape, and they remember those special things that might not be iconic to anyone else, but to them. And it’s fun when you get reminded of that.” ~ Randy Hahn

“They’ve heard the same two voices for 30 years. And to just change that for no good reason, most people wouldn’t do that. So we’re very blessed in that the longer we’re around, in some ways, the more valuable we become.” ~ Randy Hahn

“And for anybody to just come in and decide to make a change for change’s sake, they better be very careful with that.” ~ Randy Hahn

“It’s not instant; it takes a long time, but when you have it, it’s a great, great thing. And it’s what I always tell the young broadcasters: you have to get comfortable enough to where you are yourself on the air.” ~ Randy Hahn

“It’s a process and it’s just about any walk in life. It takes repetitions. You just have to keep your nose down and grind out day after day, week after week, year after year of getting good at something.” ~ Randy Hahn

“It’s very hard to be instantly authentic. That takes reps. You’ve got to repeatedly do what you do for a while and get comfortable and get confidence. You know, our business is crazy. And I’ll bet you I’m singing to the choir here when you have to have a lot of self-confidence and believe in yourself because not many people pat you on the back. There are a lot more people who are waiting for you to stumble or look to criticize. So, you know, you have to have that self-belief and you have to have that level of self-confidence to keep doing what you do every day and every game. And that’s where the authenticity comes in.” ~ Randy Hahn

Guest’s Bio:

Randy Hahn is a Canadian-American play-by-play commentator for the San Jose Sharks on NBC Sports California and has held that position for over 30 seasons. He has over 40 years of broadcast experience, mostly in hockey. Celebrating a milestone, he called his 2,000th Sharks game on December 13, 2022, during the matchup against the Arizona Coyotes in San Jose.

Teaming up with analyst and former partner Drew Remenda, Hahn secured five Northern California Emmy Awards in the “On Camera Sports” category, with victories in 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008. Beyond hockey, Hahn served as a play-by-play announcer in Konami’s NHL Blades of Steel ’99 and 2K Sports’ NHL 2K9, NHL 2K10, and NHL 2K11. Hahn and Rick Davis provided commentary for the inaugural FIFA Women’s World Cup final in Guangzhou, China, broadcasted on SportsChannel America in November 1991. Some of his other TV and radio work has been with the San Diego Sockers, Los Angeles Kings, Vancouver Canucks, and Edmonton Oilers.

Currently married to Andrea Buswell Hahn, owner of the Frost Cupcake Factory in San Jose, Randy Hahn continues to contribute his expertise and passion to the world of sports broadcasting.

Guest’s Contact Info:

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