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heather@garyscottthomas.com

Dr. Susan Landers

By Author, Personal Growth No Comments

In This Episode:

  • SCC Football
  • Sexismn and When Dr. Susan Landers Realized That She Could Have a Career In Medicine
  • Parenting When Both You and Your Spouse Work
  • Being An Older Parent
  • What a Neonatologist Is 
  • The Scary Thing That Took Place After the Birth of Gary’s Son and the Miracle That Happened
  • Postpartum Depression and How Dr. Susan Landers Dealt With Burn Out
  • Dr. Susan Landers’s Book “So Many Babies”

Quotations:

“She said, ‘You can do whatever you want to do, this is the 70s, do whatever you want.” – Dr. Susan Landers

“She was telling people to go into stereotypical fields.” – Dr. Susan Landers

“He didn’t want kids, I had to talk him into it.” – Dr. Susan Landers 

“Any baby that’s not a normal healthy newborn after delivery goes to the neonatal intensive care unit and that’s what I did for a living.” – Dr. Susan Landers

“I had a really difficult time being a mom, being confident in being a mom, because I was struggling.” – Dr. Susan Landers

Guest’s Bio:

Dr. Landers graduated from Auburn University, in Auburn, Alabama, with BS degrees in Biology and Chemistry. At Auburn, she was elected to Mortar Board, the National Women’s Honorary. In 1977, she received her MD degree from the Medical University of South Carolina, in Charleston, South Carolina. There she was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA), the National Medical Honorary. After graduation from medical school, she completed a pediatrics residency at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School hospitals in Dallas, Texas, in 1980. She completed her neonatology fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine hospitals, in Houston, Texas, in 1983.

Dr. Landers practiced academic neonatology for fourteen years and served on the faculty of two medical schools – Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston, and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, in Little Rock. In this role, she conducted clinical research, published twenty-three peer-reviewed papers, and taught medical students, residents, and fellows. While caring for patients in private practice, she served as a speaker for the Texas Department of State Health Services from 1997 to 1998. She was Medical Director of the Mothers’ Milk Bank at Austin, from 2000 to 2004, and served on the milk bank’s board of directors from 2006 to 2009.

Even though she practiced full-time, Dr. Landers continued to publish papers and work for the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). She was an expert in breastfeeding medicine and became a Fellow of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (FABM) in 2002. She served as a physician educator at AAP and ABM national meetings for a decade. She served on the Executive Committee of the Section on Breastfeeding in the AAP from 2008 until 2014. In that capacity, she contributed to AAP policy statements and clinical guidelines and wrote four more peer-reviewed publications and a book chapter. In 2008, she was recognized by Pediatrix Medical Group with a national award for “Outstanding Accomplishments in Quality Improvement.”

Together with her husband, Dr. Phillip Berry, she raised three children, one son, and two daughters, each to young adulthood. David, thirty-six, is a cinematographer, living and working in Los Angeles, CA; he is married to Alissa. Anne, thirty-four, is a pediatric intensive care unit nurse at Dell Children’s Medical Center, in Austin, TX; she is married to Joe. Laura, thirty, lives and works in Austin, TX.

Guest’s Contact Info:

https://susanlandersmd.com/

Dr. Ellen Snee

By Author, Personal Growth No Comments

In This Episode:

  • The Biggest Thing She Learned From Being a Nun for Eighteen Years and Why She Stopped
  • Why Women Don’t Have To Act Like Men To Lead
  • How To Trust Your Inner Voice, A Good Way To Go About Making Big Decisions
  • The Difference Between Coaches and Therapists
  • How Employee Reviews Should Be Approached and the Best Way To Terminate An Employee
  • Post Pandemic Workplace Predictions and the Need For Childcare For Employees In the Workplace
  • Dr. Snee Discusses Her Book “Lead” and How To Harness Your Personal Power

Quotations:

“I have tried to change the world, one woman, at a time.” – Dr. Ellen Snee

“I had the opportunity to see that there wasn’t one style of leadership for women, that every kind of woman could be a leader.” – Dr. Ellen Snee

“Most therapists kind of sit and listen and I knew I couldn’t do that, I wanna get in there and solve problems.” – Dr. Ellen Snee

“Listening is a real skill and not everyone has that skill.” – Dr. Ellen Snee

“Well, I’m actually very anxious about how the changes post-pandemic are going to impact women.” – Dr. Ellen Snee

“I also worry that childcare responsibilities will fall on women if child care opportunities do not open up.” – Dr. Ellen Snee

“We have a power that we can name and claim or we can let voices in our head rob us of it or we can let other people rob us of it if we’re not careful.” – Dr. Ellen Snee

Guest’s Bio:

Ellen Snee has been at the forefront of women’s leadership for more than 25 years. Dr. Snee brings strategy, research, and executive experience to global companies and their top female talent. Her original research at Harvard University on women’s experience in roles of authority formed the foundation of her consulting and coaching work with Fortune 500 companies such as Cisco, Goodyear, Marriott, Pfizer, and Schwab.

Later, as the Global VP of Leadership Development at VMware, she launched the company’s groundbreaking business initiative, VMwomen, designed to attract, develop, advance, and retain talented women. Her new book Lead: How Women in Charge Claim Their Authority makes her wisdom and experience accessible to all women seeking to accelerate their careers. Dr. Snee lives in the San Francisco Bay Area where she continues to coach and advise women leaders and executives worldwide and frequently speaks to companies and conferences.

Guest’s Contact Info:

https://www.ellensnee.com/

Richard Sterban

By Music No Comments

In This Episode:

  • The Difference Between Singing a Low Tone and Singing A Quality Note
  • Why Singers Should Sing They’re Best No Matter The Crowd Size
  • The Common Ground Between Country Music and Baseball
  • What Is Was Like Having Conway Twitty as a Neighbor
  • What Made Richard Leave Elvis To Join the Oak Ridge Boys
  • Richard Speaks About Whether The Oak Ridge Boys Will Retire Soon and Their New Album “Front Porch Singing”

Quotations:

“So what I did, I just basically followed my heart and I made the decision to leave Elvis and to join the Oak Ridge Boys.” – Richard Sterban

“Just about 3 or 4 weeks ago we were able to be booked at the Opera for the first show that they allowed 100% capacity and what a great night that was.” – Richard Sterban

“There’s a certain psychology to bass singing.” – Richard Sterban

“Elvis was kind of a strange person.” – Richard Sterban

“I remember being in the studio recording ‘Elvira’ and it felt like a hit, you know, the musicians were smiling and everyone was having a good time.” – Richard Sterban

Guest’s Bio:

Richard Anthony Sterban (born April 24, 1943) is an American singer. He was born in Camden, New Jersey. He joined the country and gospel quartet The Oak Ridge Boys in 1972.

Sterban grew up in Collingswood, New Jersey,[1] After graduating from Collingswood High School, Sterban attended Trenton State College (now The College of New Jersey).[2]

He lives in Hendersonville, Tennessee, with his wife, Donna, and two daughters. Richard also has three sons from a previous marriage and several grandchildren.

Prior to joining The Oak Ridge Boys, Sterban toured with J. D. Sumner and the Stamps Quartet, who were singing backup for Elvis Presley at that time. Sterban ultimately became best known for his “oom-pa-pa-oom-pa-pa-oom-pa-pa-mow-mow” bass solo in the Oak Ridge Boys’ 1981 single “Elvira” and sang lead vocals on a select few of the group’s songs, including a cover of The Righteous Brothers’ hit “Dream On“, which was a top-ten hit.

Sterban has recorded public service announcements for NOAA Weather Radio. He served as the voice of The Roadhouse, the classic country Sirius Satellite Radio channel. Sterban, along with entrepreneur Larry Schmittou and other country music stars, such as Conway TwittyLarry Gatlin, and Cal Smith, was a minority owner of the Nashville Sounds minor league baseball team from 1978 to 2008.[3]

(Bio from Wikipedia)

Guest’s Contact Info:

oakridgeboys.com

Lissa Kreisler

By Music No Comments

In This Episode:

  • Why Lissa’s First Job Involved Her Having To Sniff Armpits
  • What It’s Like Getting Recognized In Public From Her Laugh
  • The Mean Nickname She Was Given by Highschoolers Due To Her Having To Wear a Full Body Brace
  • Why Lissa Kept Her Maiden Name For On The Radio
  • Growing Up Wearing Homemade Clothes and Why She Promised To Never Wear Homemade Clothes Again
  • What Gary Did That Made His Kid Ask Him, “Why Do You Hate Me?”
  • Lissa’s Take On Vaccines and Mask Wearing
  • The Nastiness and Hatred On Social Media

Quotations:

“I would ride an elephant down Santa Clara street downtown.” – Lissa Kreisler

“I cannot believe what people feel they can say on Social media.” – Lissa Kreisler 

“That one raise changed my whole life.” – Lissa Kreisler

“I probably told my listeners everything about me, but my bra size.” – Lissa Kreisler

“My job was to stand behind the counter and when somebody returned something, I had to bend down to the floor and smell the armpits to make sure that nothing’s worn.” – Lissa Kreisler

Guest’s Bio:

She’s a local gal who has been at KLOK 1170 for 10 years. What started as an internship ended as the Ralph Jim and Lissa morning show. She spent 30 years doing mornings at KBAY and was inducted into the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame in 2015.
She loves doing Community Storytelling on KCAT-15 in Los Gatos!
She’s a full-time grandma of 3–ages 2-6
She thinks life is wonderful…even in COVID!

Guest’s Contact Info:

Instagram Username: @Lissakreisler